Today in History

July 28

Soldiers in gas masks advance on Bonus March demonstrators in Washington, D.C. 1932. The marchers were unemployed World War I veterans waiting for the monetary bonus promised by the government and not delivered.Soldiers in gas masks advance on Bonus March demonstrators in Washington, D.C. 1932. The marchers were unemployed World War I veterans waiting for the monetary bonus promised by the government and not delivered.
1540 – Thomas Cromwell is executed at the order of Henry VIII of England on charges of treason. Henry marries his fifth wife, Catherine Howard, on the same day.
1854 – USS Constellation (1854), the last all-sail warship built by the United States Navy, is commissioned.
1866 – At the age of 18, Vinnie Ream becomes the first and youngest female artist to receive a commission from the U.S. government for a statue (of Abraham Lincoln).
1868 – The 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution is certified, establishing African American citizenship and guaranteeing due process of law.
1896 – The city of Miami, Florida is incorporated.
1914 – In the culmination of the July Crisis, Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia, igniting World War I.
1915 – The United States begins a 20-year occupation of Haiti.
1932 – U.S. President Herbert Hoover orders the United States Army to forcibly evict the “Bonus Army” of World War I veterans gathered in Washington, D.C.
1935 – First flight of the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress.
A mural in west Belfast, Ireland, from 2005, the year the Provisional Irish Republican Army announced the ending of its armed campaign.
1945 – A U.S. Army B-25 bomber crashes into the 79th floor of the Empire State Building, killing 14 and injuring 26.
1965 – Vietnam War: U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson announces his order to increase the number of troops in South Vietnam from 75,000 to 125,000.
1973 – Summer Jam at Watkins Glen: Nearly 600,000 people attend a rock festival at the Watkins Glen International Raceway.
1976 – The Tangshan earthquake measuring between 7.8 and 8.2 moment magnitude flattens Tangshan in the People’s Republic of China, killing 242,769 and injuring 164,851.
1996 – The remains of a prehistoric man are discovered near Kennewick, Washington. Such remains will be known as the Kennewick Man.
2001 – Australian Ian Thorpe becomes the first swimmer to win six gold medals at a single World Championship.
2002 – Nine coal miners trapped in the flooded Quecreek Mine in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, are rescued after 77 hours underground.
2005 – The Provisional Irish Republican Army calls an end to its thirty-year-long armed campaign in Northern Ireland.
Births
1866 – Beatrix Potter, English children’s author and illustrator (“The Tale of Peter Rabbit”)
1929 – Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, American First Lady (1961-63)
1945 – Jim Davis, American cartoonist, creator of the comic strip “Garfield”
Deaths
1741 – Antonio Vivaldi, Italian Baroque composer (The Four Seasons)

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